Posted by: richarlm | December 5, 2018

Toy Safety

teddy bears

December is Safe Toys and Celebrations Month. Consult these resources to select safe toys this holiday season and all year.

Recalled Toys and Products

Posted by: richarlm | December 4, 2018

Selections from the Art of Science and Innovation

A Mindful Inhibition by Mark Zylka

A Mindful Inhibition by Mark Zylka

Dr. Jack Griffith, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology in the UNC School of Medicine, and Jill Diaz of the North Carolina Museum of Art, recently appeared on YOUR HEALTH®Radio to discuss a new exhibit, “The Art of Science and Innovation.” The free exhibition runs through January 14, 2019, and features images from UNC School of Medicine Scientists.

Listen to the show!

Information on the artists (pdf)

 

Posted by: yourhealthradio | November 30, 2018

Blurring the Lines between Science and Art

ncma art.jpeg

A drain in the heart by Kathleen Caron

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam and guest co-host Dr. Jamila Battle talk with Dr. Jack Griffith—Kenan Distinguished professor of microbiology and immunology and biochemistry— and Jill Diaz—director of corporate relations at the North Carolina Museum of Art—about a new exhibit that blurs the lines between science and art.

You can catch the episode on:

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, December 1 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, December 2 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, December 3 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, December 2 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

You may also like:

Two Careers, One Life with Dr. Eduardo Lapetina (YOUR HEALTH Radio April 2014)

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH® Adam and guest co-host Dr. Nathan Sison welcome the secretary of North Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services Dr. Mandy Cohen for a conversation about her vision for North Carolina’s health care as well as how the state is responding to the opioid crisis.

Please tune in! The show will air: SecMandyCohen_headshot

WCHL 97.9 FM

  • Saturday, November 24, at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, November 25, at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, November 26, at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, November 25, at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

 

You may also like:

Opioids and Chronic Pain with Dr. Daniel Alford (YOUR HEALTH Radio May 2016)

Posted by: yourhealthradio | November 16, 2018

Explaining “America’s Great Divide” with Jonathan Weiler

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam and guest co-host Dr. Jamila Battle talk with Dr. Jonathan Weiler—director of undergraduate studies and professor in UNC’s Curriculum in Global Studies—about his new book Prius or Pickup? How the Answers to Four Simple Questions Explain America’s Great Divide.

You can catch the episode on:JWeiler2

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, November 17 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, November 18 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, November 19 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, November 18 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

Posted by: yourhealthradio | November 9, 2018

Healthy Hearing

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam and guest co-host Dr. Stephen Hooper talk with Patricia Johnson, AuD, clinical audiologist and assistant professor of Allied Health Sciences at UNC Chapel Hill, about healthy hearing.

You can catch the episode on:patricia_johnson

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, November 10 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, November 11 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, November 12 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, November 11 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

Posted by: richarlm | November 7, 2018

Election Day Stress

Vote button

The following is a transcript of a Research that Matters piece from YOUR HEALTH Radio “Tiny Changes Can Have a Big Impact” November 3, 2018.

Adam Goldstein: Actually something that’s really critically important to what’s happening in society today. How results of presidential elections affect health, and boy, this is a loaded topic.

Stephen Hooper: Yeah, the last election created enormous distress and just anecdotally, I’m sure you’ve heard, Adam, that there were lots of families, they were arguing at the dinner table about this one and the amount of stress was probably enormous afterwards.

Adam Goldstein: And you know it’s interesting because it may be presumed, well if you were supporting a particular candidate then you were more or less happier with that candidate and if you weren’t supportive you were unhappy. What I wonder, and that’s what this research is going to show, let’s just kind of give the punchline, what I don’t know is has this been like this forever. In this particular study among 769 college students followed after the election, they were looking at whether or not there were depressive symptoms, avoidance of certain people and situations and intrusions associated with this stress.

Stephen Hooper: Correct and the population was college students, rather a large sample about 769 and the findings was that quarter of those students 25% reported clinically significant stress symptoms related to the election. So what did they do about that? In many ways, you sit there and you say, well do these students need some help for those symptoms on one side of the equation and the other side is wow, what a number.

Adam Goldstein: Whether that translates into anger and frustration and depression, it turns out that this was found higher in sexual minorities and African Americans, perhaps not surprising given what’s happening in the country. And there was less stress by registered Republicans and males. Even 25% said that the election had a negative impact on relationships. Regardless, this is so concerning and I think as a healthcare provider the willingness to, when you know people are at risk, who may be at risk, you have to ask the question and be willing to listen and maybe refer for therapy if needed.

Stephen Hooper: Additionally I would add it also impacts and suggests the importance of that college age population in the voting world. It does have an impact.

Posted by: yourhealthradio | November 2, 2018

Tiny Changes Can Have a Big Impact

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam and guest co-host Dr. Stephen Hooper talk with Dr. Antoine Bailliard—professor in UNC Allied Health’s division of occupational science and occupational therapy—about how tiny changes can have a big impact on mental illness and homelessness.

You can catch the episode on:OS_Bailliard.jpg

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, November 3 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, November 4 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, November 5 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, November 4 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

Posted by: yourhealthradio | October 26, 2018

Re-air: “Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear”

Untitled designAs Halloween approaches, we’ll take a look back on YOUR HEALTH® to when Adam and guest co-host Dr. Michael Baca-Atlas talked with sociologist Dr. Margee Kerr about her book Scream: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear.

Please tune in! The show will air:

WCHL 97.9 FM

  • Saturday 10/27 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday 10/28 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday 10/29 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday 10/28 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

 

 

Posted by: richarlm | October 24, 2018

On-again, Off-again Relationships

Holdings hands in front of ocean

Image https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Holding_hands_2.jpg

The following is a transcript of a Research that Matters piece from Oral Historians Collect “Stories to Save Lives” YOUR HEALTH Radio October 20, 2018

Dr. Adam Goldstein: Our very first research is about relationships that are on-again and off-again and does that lead to higher rates of adverse bad mental health? Were you ever in a relationship that was on-again or off-again?

Dr. Jamila Battle: Yeah, when I was young and in high school, you know.

Dr. Adam Goldstein: Young and reckless.

Dr. Jamila Battle: Young love.

Dr. Adam Goldstein: I kind of like, one year, then two years, then three years and all of a sudden, I got married. And I’ve been married 33 years, so I didn’t have too many of those on-again, off-again. But apparently it’s pretty frequent and the question is, from the researchers at the University of Missouri, is there something more to it that could actually be bad for your health?

Dr. Jamila Battle: Well prior research has estimated that more than 60% of adults have been involved in these on and off relationships and more than 1/3 of cohabiting couples report breaking up and later reconciling at some point. And that these relationships are often associated with higher rates of abuse, poor communication and lower levels of commitment.

Dr. Adam Goldstein: And this current study, they actually looked at data from 500 individuals who are currently in relationships and interviews and looking at their breaking up and getting back together. And they’re looking at how those events may be related and found that they were significantly associated. The more you had those type of episodes, the more you had psychological distress like anxiety and depression. It didn’t really matter if it was same-sex or heterosexual relationship. And that, I guess, is concerning, though I’m not fully certain what to make of it.

Dr. Jamila Battle: And I don’t think they really knew what to make of it either. But they did say that partners that break up and reunite for a number of reasons. And the common ones were necessity or practicality and that partners should get back together based on dedication not obligation.

Dr. Adam Goldstein: Yeah, I like that, though, I think it’s complicated, right? And certainly there’s lots of factors going into it, which is probably why they’re getting back together and breaking up and getting back together and breaking up. There. I think the key point is, and I like what they say, it’s okay to end a toxic relationship. I like that. If it’s not working, it’s not working. This is in the journal Family Relations. “Coming out and getting back in: relationship cycling and distress in same and different sex relationships.” I like the research even though I don’t understand it, fully.

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