Posted by: yourhealthradio | August 1, 2019

Bringing Global Health Home

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam and guest co-host Dr. Brian Huggins talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Laurie Garrett about her work to bring global health home for her readers.

You can catch the episode on:Laurie+Garrett+Headshot_Personal+Website

97.9 FM The Hill

• Saturday, August 3 at 9 a.m.
• Sunday, August 4 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
• Monday, August 5 at 6 p.m.


KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

• Sunday, August 4 at 7 a.m.

 

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Posted by: yourhealthradio | July 26, 2019

Re-air: How Parental Leave Policies Impact a Family’s Health

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam talks with professor and founding director of the WORLD Policy Analysis Center at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Dr. Jody Heymann about how parental leave policies impact a family’s health.

You can catch the episode on:

j.heymann.2840

Photo by Betsy Winchell

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, July 27 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, July 28 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, July 29 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, July 28 at 7 a.m.

 

 

Listen to the show!

 

Posted by: yourhealthradio | July 19, 2019

Re-air: The Effects of Racism on Health

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam and guest co-host Dr. Shannon Aymes talk with Dr. Chandra Ford—associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at UCLA and founding director of the Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice and Health—about her work to illuminate the effects of racism on health.

You can catch the episode on:2018-06-22 CHANDRA 10 200x200

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, July 20 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, July 21 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, July 22 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, July 21 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

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Posted by: yourhealthradio | July 12, 2019

Re-air: Divorce and Health

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam and guest co-host Dr. Jamila Battle talk with Dr. David Sbarra—professor and director of clinical training in the department of psychology at the University of Arizona—about the relationship between divorce and health.

You can catch the episode on: Sbarra_Headshot2016

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, July 13 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, July 14 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, July 15 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, July 14 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

The following is a transcript of a recent Research That Matters piece on implicit bias. Listen to this segment and the rest of the show “Working Together to Improve the Care of an Aging Population.”

Dr. Adam Goldstein: This very first one is perhaps one that perhaps I have fallen victim to and can really strive to do better. And it’s the terms that we use to describe our mentees. We’re going to be talking about mentorship in the conversations with our senior adults, but this is about our mentees, the learners, and particularly let’s say medical students. When they do rotations with us they’re frequently coming with us for a rotation 4-6 weeks; they may be with us every day; they may be shadowing providers; they may be seeing patients with us and presenting to us. And at the very end of that period of time we do evaluations of the students. Some authors from the University of San Francisco, California published an article in the Journal of General Internal Medicine which said, do the evaluations that I, and maybe my colleagues, do differ by the gender and the minority status of the students. So specifically, do I write different things whether or not the medical student is a male or female or African American or non-African American and do I then perhaps implicitly have some bias of how I describe and maybe evaluate them. I don’t know if the research completely answers that. But it’s really quite interesting because they actually looked at over 9 years, from 2006 and 2015 both in California and San Francisco and at Brown University at over 90,000 narrative evaluations of third year students. That alone, I think, is an impressive understanding, the evaluation and collecting it orally and they were really saying is it on the behavior of the student or the competencies, the skills that they show or don’t show that are relevant but that a lot of times people when they were evaluating used a kind of personal description and it was really striking by gender, and it really could impact on their evaluations. So for instance, in 2/3 of the words that the evaluators used differed by gender on the personal attributes, half of which were more likely to be used to describe women, so the word pleasant was associated with getting a passing grade. The word energetic, cheerful, lovely and wonderful and fabulous was associated with honors grades. And those were with women. For men it was respectful and considerate while good was associated with passing grades and humble was more common among those with honors grades. We’re clearly having some bias by the gender there, influencing how we are writing about them. When we were talking about a minority status we also tended to have certain words that we use. So we were more likely to use present, open and nice to describe the minority students with passing grades versus words like enthusiastic, sharp and bright for the non-minority students and mature and sophisticated for honors grades. I think what this shows us is that we tend to have biases of the types of words we use to describe people versus, I wouldn’t use those same words if I didn’t know the gender or the minority status. I’d like to think that I’m not bias. But I think this research suggests that I need to do a better job and we all need to do a better job with how it is we describe what it is we’re witnessing even when it comes by people who we think are being non-biased.

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Posted by: yourhealthradio | July 5, 2019

Re-air: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam talks with  Dr. Michael Kinch—associate vice chancellor and director of the Centers for Research Innovation in Biotechnology and Drug Discovery at Washington University in St. Louis—about his new book Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity.

You can catch the episode on:

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, July 6 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, July 7 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, July 8 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, July 7 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

You may also like:

Fighting Future Flu Outbreaks (YOUR HEALTH Radio August 2018)

The Changing Laws of Vaccines with Dr. Michelle Mello (YOUR HEALTH Radio October 2015)

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam and guest co-hosts Dr. Shiara Ortiz-Pujols and Dr. Matthew Hall welcome psychotherapist and author Lori Gottlieb, who shares insights from her new book Maybe You Should Talk To Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed.

You can catch the episode on:

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, June 29 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, June 30 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, July 1 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, June 30 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

Posted by: richarlm | June 27, 2019

National HIV Testing Day, June 27

HIV is an abbreviation for “human immunodeficiency virus”, which damages your immune system by destroying the white blood cells.  This puts you at higher risk for infections and even certain types of cancers.  Many people associate HIV with AIDS (“acquired immunodeficiency syndrome”), which is the final stage of HIV; however, not everyone who is HIV-positive develops AIDS.  HIV is most commonly acquired through unprotected sex, but also can be spread in other ways. 

Many HIV-positive people don’t know they have the virus.  Since life expectancy without treatment ranges from 9 to 11 years, it is important to be tested, even if you think you are not infected.  There is no cure for HIV, but there are medicines to help treat the symptoms and reduce the risk of spreading the virus to others.

The best ways to lower your risk of getting HIV include:

  • Not having sex
  • Avoiding unprotected sex
  • Using a condom correctly every time you have sex
  • Limiting your number of sexual partners
  • Never sharing needles

Tests can be done through your doctor’s office or even through an at-home test kit. You also can ask about free testing sites near you by calling the national referral hotline.

1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636 in English and en español)

1-888-232-6348 – TTY

Learn more about HIV with these resources:

Written by Michele Clark, PhD, MLS

You may also like:
A Tent, a Parking Lot and a Group of Devoted People Trying to Save Lives with Dr. David Schaffer, Your Health Radio, May 30, 2019

Health Technology and Curbing the Spread of HIV, with Dr. Lisa Hightow-Weidman, Your Health Radio, June 10, 2017

The Cutting Edge of HIV Research, with Dr. Victor Garcia and Dr. Jenna Honeycutt, Your Health Radio, June 11, 2016

Posted by: yourhealthradio | June 20, 2019

Working Together to Improve the Care of an Aging Population

image001

Will Plattner getting to know UNC medical school mentees at the 2019 kick-off luncheon for Senior Mentor Program

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®, Adam talks with Dr. Ellen Roberts—director of the Senior Mentor Program in UNC’s Division of Geriatric Medicine—and Will Plattner—a longtime volunteer mentor—about working together to improve the care of an aging population.

You can catch the episode on:

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, June 22 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, June 23 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, June 24 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, June 23 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

Posted by: yourhealthradio | June 14, 2019

The Real Science Behind Tricks of the Mind

This weekend on YOUR HEALTH®,  Adam and guest co-host Dr. Stephen Hooper talk with Dr. Luana Colloca—placebo expert, pain researcher and associate professor at the University of Maryland—about the real science behind tricks of the mind.

You can catch the episode on:Colloca,-Luanna-1

97.9 FM The Hill

  • Saturday, June 15 at 9 a.m.
  • Sunday, June 16 at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • Monday, June 17 at 6 p.m.

KKAG Retro Radio 88.3 FM

  • Sunday, June 16 at 7 a.m.

Listen to the show!

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